Lean Color


Lean color is the primary factor that determines the fresh meat quality discerned by consumers at the point of sale, whereas taste components (such as tenderness, juiciness and flavor) of the cooked meat determines the overall palatability, affecting the consumers’ repeated purchasing decision.

Optimum surface color of fresh meat (i.e., cherry-red for beef; dark cherry-red for lamb; reddish-pink for pork; and pale pink for veal) is highly unstable and short-lived. When meat is fresh and protected from contact with air (such as in vacuum packages), it has the purple-red color that comes from myoglobin, one of the two key pigments responsible for the color of meat. When exposed to air, myoglobin forms the pigment, oxymyoglobin, which gives meat a pleasingly cherry-red color. The use of a plastic wrap that allows oxygen to pass through it helps ensure that the cut meats will retain this bright red color.

  • The amount of myoglobin in animal muscles determines the color of meat. Lamb and Pork are classified  as "red" meat along with beef and veal as they contain more myoglobin than chicken or fish, which is considered "white" meat. When fresh pork is cooked, it becomes lighter in color, but it is still a red meat.
  • Raw poultry can vary from a bluish-white to yellow. All of these colors are normal and are a direct result of breed, exercise, age, and/or diet. Younger poultry has less fat under the skin, which can cause the bluish cast, and the yellow skin could be a result of marigolds in the feed.

Exposure to store lighting as well as the continued contact of myoglobin and oxymyoglobin with oxygen leads to the formation of metmyoglobin, a pigment that turns meat brownish-red. This color change alone does not mean the product is spoiled. Color changes are normal for fresh product. With spoilage there can be a change in color often a fading or darkening. In addition to the color change, the meat or poultry will have an off odor, be sticky or tacky to the touch, or it may be slimy. If meat has developed these characteristics, it should not be used.

 

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